Veles

bibliotecha-secreta:

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Veles is the Slavic god of nature, associated with dragons, wolves, cattle, magic, musicians, wealth, and trickery. Merchants often sealed their agreements by swearing upon his name, and legal documents sometimes concluded with oaths to him (oath breakers were believed to be punished with disease). He is also the opponent of thunder-god Perun, and the battle between two of them constitutes one of the most important myths of Slavic mythology.

Appearance

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Veles is sad to be serpentine, with horns, and a long beard. However, the Slavs initially believed that Veles exclusively appears in the shape of a bear even though he is able to transform into various other animals that he protects.  The image of Veles as a bear might have come from the Slav belief that the Bear is the king of the forest that protects and takes care of all other animals, plants and the forest itself. In later scriptures, like almost all major gods, Veles became a demon, lost his primary functions and was associated with the devil and the underworld, most likely due to his human form that looked like a strong, young man with horns.

The Underworld

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Ancient Slavs viewed their world as a huge tree, with the treetop and branches representing the heavenly abode of gods and the world of mortals, whilst the roots represented the underworld. And while Perun, seen as a hawk or eagle sitting on a tallest branch of tree, was believed to be ruler of heaven and living world, Veles, seen as a huge serpent coiling around the roots, was ruling the world of dead. Veles regularly sent spirits of the dead into the living world as his heralds.

Festivals in honour of him were held near the end of the year, in winter, when time was coming to the very end of world order, chaos was growing stronger, the borders between worlds of living and dead were fading, and ancestral spirits would return amongst the living. This was the ancient pagan celebration of Velja Noć (Great Night), the relic of which still persists amongst many Slavic countries in folk customs of Koleda. Young men, known as koledari or vučari would dress long coats of sheep’s wool and grotesque masks, roaming around villages in groups and raising noise. They sang songs saying they travelled a long way, and they are all wet and muddy, an allusion of the wet underworld of Veles from which they came as ghosts of dead. The master of any house they visited would welcome them warmly and presented them with gifts. This is an example of Slavic shamanism, which also indicates Veles was a god of magic and wealth. The gifts given to koledari were probably believed to be passed onto him (which makes him very much like a dragon hoarding treasure), thus ensuring good fortune and wealth for the house and family through entire year.

Very accurate, just the picture on the top is questionable (for me). I’m in love with this.

(via werlicnessebaeddon)

Yeah, it's says Veles is a god in the description. You just reblogged the old version of my m-meme post before I changed the labelling from Slavic "pantheon and paganism" to "gods and goddesses" awhile ago. ♡

Ok, thanks for the info! Great text, love it. :) Also, the text was in our queue so I didn’t reblog it today. 

divine-thrills:

mythology meme | Slavic pantheon and paganism - Veles

(x) Veles is a major Slavic supernatural force of earth, waters and the underworld, associated with dragons, cattle, magic, musicians, wealth and trickery. Imagined as a partially serpentine god with horns, he is the opponent of the Supreme thunder-god Perun, and the battle between two of them constitutes one of the most important myths of Slavic mythology.
In his role as a trickster god, he is in some ways similar to both Greek Hermes and Scandinavian Loki, and like them, he was connected with magic. He regularly sent spirits of the dead into the living world as his heralds. Festivals in honour of him were held near the end of the year, when time was coming to the very end of world order and chaos was growing stronger. The borders between worlds of living and dead were fading, and ancestral spirits would return amongst the living. 


Veles is a God in Slavic mythology, actually.
lilymoth:

Slavic Mythology: Pscipolnitsa or Lady Midday

She was usually pictured as a young woman dressed in white that roamed field bounds. She assailed folk working at noon causing heatstroke and aches in the neck, sometimes she even caused madness.
Pscipolnitsa, who makes herself evident in the middle of hot summer days, takes the form of whirling dust clouds and carries a scythe or shears; most likely the shears would be of an older style, not akin to modern scissors. She will stop people in the field to ask them difficult questions or engage them in conversation. If anyone fails to answer a question or tries to change the subject, she will cut off their head or strike them with illness. She may appear as an old hag, a beautiful woman, or a 12-year-old girl, and she was useful in scaring children away from valuable crops. She is only seen on the hottest part of the day and is a personification of a sunstroke. [x]
slavic-mythology:

Oath of Svarog, 2003.
Boris Olshanskiy, a lesser-known painter from the turn of the 21st century drew fantastic scenes from Slavic mythology.